Natives — Feeding

Feeding

Native animals must have access to adequate and appropriate feed for their age, stage of production, climate and season.

Live vertebrate animals must not be used as a food source for other animals. If whole animals are required as a food source then the animal must be killed humanely before being given as food to another animal.

Feeding records must be maintained for all native animals kept.

 

The natural diets of native animals vary depending on the species. The types and quantities of foods they require reflect the nutritional needs of the particular species and the time of the year and climate.

It is best, as a general rule, to try and provide native animals with the sorts of food they normally feed upon. But live animals must not be used as a food source for other animals at schools. If whole animals are required as a food source, such as for reptiles, then the animal must be killed humanely before being given as food to another animal.

bearded dragons feeding

As a general rule, to try and provide native animals with the sorts of food they normally feed upon.

A native animal’s willingness to feed in captivity is in part an indication of its acceptance of its environment. Animals must be familiar with, and feel secure in, the environment that they are provided with. The native animal you keep at school may have been bred in captivity, but a school environment can present additional stresses for any animal.

Feeding records must be kept to ensure that each animal is being fed adequately and to allow identification of any unfavourable feeding trends, should they occur. Details should be recorded in a book, spreadsheet or on a feed recording sheet attached to each enclosure. The information recorded should include:

    • Feeding dates
    • Food offered
    • Food accepted
    • Date of any significant event, e.g. skin sloughing, any veterinary treatments.